Writing a book Feed

In fact, if you don't prove you have an established platform, with thousands of possible readers, traditional publishers won't even talk to you. No matter how great your proposal is. Oh, yeah, I forgot - before you do or prove any of the above to a traditional publisher, you have to prove you can sell the book and earn back your royalty for the advance. At which time, they will are likely to Read more →


"I was so excited to hold my book in my hand," a friend of mine told me. "It's just marvelous to have it here, done, and ready to be shared with the world. I can't even believe how heavy it is!" The awe in her voice was shining in her eyes, and I couldn't help but share in it. That finished book, that magnificent manuscript is so much more than a collection of words and paragraphs. Yes, it's an accomplishment few achieve, but it's also a birthing of a new you. Read more →


This is where the work happens. You create your TOC - table of contents. You write your introduction. You write and write. And, if you need that extra help, you get a book coach to keep you moving forward, not only with your writing, but in keeping true to both your throughline and all the things you want to happen after the book is launched.  Read more →


The written word has endured for thousands of years. Human beings have, since the invention of the printing press, certainly, if not long before, had a hankering for writing things down. Lists. Musings. Ideas. And, journals full of historical perspective - much like The Diary of Anne Frank. Read more →


"A copy editor reads the entire manuscript while checking for many things: incorrect grammar, spelling, and punctuation; spacing and basic formatting issues; effective writing techniques such as word choice, parallel construction, passive voice over active voice, limited repetitions and clichés, avoiding vague or offensive language; and consistency of spelling and treatment of names, places, objects, actions, etc." Read more →


In my work, I talk with would-be authors, and new start-ups - generally solopreneurs - who are holding on to the past as if it will keep them from hanging themselves on the future. Somehow they believe past performance is a predictor of future earnings. While it's good to reflect on the past, it's never good to live there. Paul shares his epiphany at around 11 minutes in - the only tense if future tense. It's an arrow in flight and you want to grab it and shake it into what you want it to be. Read more →