Writing a book Feed

In the past two decades, Janine has completed her M.A. in Education, she home-schools the herd, she started another entrepreneurial venture (The8Gates, LLC., a firm dedicated to teaching fundamental principles of lifestyle independence), has written 10 books and teaches math and metaphysics in her spare time. I mean, in her spare time. That's all. (alien) Read more →


In fact, if you don't prove you have an established platform, with thousands of possible readers, traditional publishers won't even talk to you. No matter how great your proposal is. Oh, yeah, I forgot - before you do or prove any of the above to a traditional publisher, you have to prove you can sell the book and earn back your royalty for the advance. At which time, they will are likely to Read more →


In my work, I talk with would-be authors, and new start-ups - generally solopreneurs - who are holding on to the past as if it will keep them from hanging themselves on the future. Somehow they believe past performance is a predictor of future earnings. While it's good to reflect on the past, it's never good to live there. Paul shares his epiphany at around 11 minutes in - the only tense if future tense. It's an arrow in flight and you want to grab it and shake it into what you want it to be. Read more →


Yes, when you have a book you are now "the author of" and become more sought after than before you wrote your book, but that doesn't have to mean neglecting your business.  It means accepting speaking opportunities when and where you can, and selling books in the back of the room. Meanwhile, you are now the expert in that business you wrote about in your book, and the audience wants to know all about it, all about you, and how they can work with you. Read more →


You want to start a business. You have a big idea for a book. You hope you can make the business, the book, the big idea come true. The dream of that big idea is so big in your mind’s eye, it takes up a whole room, a whole house, a whole street! Read more →